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Published on Feb 12, 2016

Abstract

Internet Information Services (IIS) web servers – which host web pages and serve them to users – are highly popular among business organizations, with over 6 million such servers installed worldwide. Unfortunately, IIS web servers are also popular among hackers and malicious fame-seekers – as a prime target for attacks. As a result, every so often, new exploits emerge which endanger your IIS web server’s integrity and stability. Many administrators have a hard time keeping up with the various security patches released for IIS to cope with each new exploit, making it easy for malicious users to find a vulnerable web server on the Internet. Immediate Intrusion Detection suggests that all of these vulnerabilities the same system files, careful monitoring of these files could provide you with an inexpensive form of real-time intrusion detection.

Description of Intrution Detection System

A correct firewall policy can minimize the exposure of many networks however they are quite useless against attacks launched from within. Hackers are also evolving their attacks and network subversion methods. These techniques include email based Trojan, stealth scanning techniques, malicious code and actual attacks, which bypass firewall policies by tunneling access over allowed protocols such as ICMP, HTTP, DNS, etc. Hackers are also very good at creating and releasing malware for the ever-growing list of application vulnerabilities to compromise the few services that are being let through by a firewall.

This field of research is called Intrusion Detection. Anderson, while introducing the concept of intrusion detection in 1980, defined an intrusion attempt or a threat to be the potential possibility of a deliberate unauthorized attempt to:-

a.access information,
b.manipulate information, or
c.render a system unreliable or unusable.

Since then, several techniques for detecting intrusions have been studied. This paper discusses why intrusion detection systems are needed, the main techniques, present research in the field, and possible future directions of research. There are two ways to handle subversion attempts. One way is to prevent subversion itself by building a completely secure system. We could, for example, require all users to identify and authenticate themselves; we could protect data by various cryptographic methods and very tight access control mechanisms. However this is not really feasible because:-

1. In practice, it is not possible to build a completely secure system because bug free software is still a dream, & no-one seems to want to make the effort to try to develop such software.Apart from the fact that we do not seem to be getting our money's worth when we buy software, there are also security implications when our E-mail software, for example, can be attacked. Designing and implementing a totally secure system is thus an extremely difficult task.

2. The vast installed base of systems worldwide guarantees that any transition to a secure system, (if it is ever developed) will be long in coming.

3. Cryptographic methods have their own problems. Passwords can be cracked, users can lose their passwords, and entire crypto-systems can be broken.

4. Even a truly secure system is vulnerable to abuse by insiders who abuse their privileges.

 

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