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Published on Feb 12, 2016

Abstract

CAPTCHAs are short for Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart. The term "CAPTCHA" was coined in 2000 by Luis Von Ahn, Manuel Blum, Nicholas J. Hopper (all of Carnegie Mellon University, and John Langford (then of IBM).

Description of CAPTCHA


You're trying to sign up for a free email service offered by Gmail or Yahoo. Before you can submit your application, you first have to pass a test. It's not a hard test -- in fact, that's the point. For you, the test should be simple and straightforward. But for a computer, the test should be almost impossible to solve.

This sort of test is a CAPTCHA. They're also known as a type of Human Interaction Proof (HIP). You've probably seen CAPTCHA tests on lots of Web sites. The most common form of CAPTCHA is an image of several distorted letters. It's your job to type the correct series of letters into a form. If your letters match the ones in the distorted image, you pass the test.

CAPTCHAs are short for Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart. The term "CAPTCHA" was coined in 2000 by Luis Von Ahn, Manuel Blum, Nicholas J. Hopper (all of Carnegie Mellon University, and John Langford (then of IBM). They are challenge-response tests to ensure that the users are indeed human. The purpose of a CAPTCHA is to block form submissions from spam bots – automated scripts that harvest email addresses from publicly available web forms. A common kind of CAPTCHA used on most websites requires the users to enter the string of characters that appear in a distorted form on the screen.

CAPTCHAs are used because of the fact that it is difficult for the computers to extract the text from such a distorted image, whereas it is relatively easy for a human to understand the text hidden behind the distortions. Therefore, the correct response to a CAPTCHA challenge is assumed to come from a human and the user is permitted into the website.